Keep reading right to the end

Former Montreal Canadiens goaltender Ken Dryden waves to the crowd at the Bell Centre as his number is retired during a pre-game ceremony Jan. 29, 2007 in Montreal. (CP /Ryan Remiorz) Former Montreal Canadiens goaltender Ken Dryden waves to the crowd at the Bell Centre as his number is retired during a pre-game ceremony Jan. 29, 2007.

Hall of Fame goalie Ken Dryden’s No. 29 retired

Updated Tue. Jan. 30 2007 10:33 AM ET

MONTREAL — The pantheon of Montreal Canadiens’ immortals has a new member — goaltending great Ken Dryden.

The erudite goaltender from the powerhouse Canadiens of the 1970s had his No. 29 retired Monday night at the Bell Centre.

Dryden was joined on the ice by his wife, Lynda, his two children and a three-week-old grandchild, while his older brother, Dave, a former Buffalo Sabres goalie, and his first coach, Al McNeil, addressed the crowd.

Former coach Scotty Bowman, teammate Larry Robinson and former Boston Bruins star Wayne Cashman offered taped testimonials on the scoreboard.

Dryden was introduced at centre ice by his opposite number in the pivotal 1972 Summit Series against the Soviet Union — Vladislav Tretiak — who received a standing ovation almost as warm.

“I played against Team Canada in 1972 and in 1975 against the Montreal Canadiens — the best hockey I ever saw,” said Tretiak, now president of the Russian Ice Hockey Federation. “Ken Dryden played unbelievable.  He was a fantastic goalie and a great man.”

… He was called up to the NHL club late in the 1970-’71 season and played well enough in six games, all wins, that management chose him over their excellent starter, Rogatien Vachon, for the playoffs against one of the league’s greatest scoring machines of all time — the Boston Bruins, featuring the likes of stars Bobby Orr and Phil Esposito.

Dryden was a rock in the net, not only ousting the Bruins in seven games, but then beating Minnesota and Chicago to win the Stanley Cup and the Conn Smythe Trophy as the best player in the post-season.

Dryden was drafted 14th overall by Boston in 1964 but traded that same year to Montreal with Alex Campbell for Guy Allen and Paul Reid.

…. For who?

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One Response to “Keep reading right to the end”

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